The rise and fall of the Bermuda Onion

In 1877, Mark Twain, the American novelist (author of the Adventures of Tom Sawyer and the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn), described the Bermuda Onion as “the pride and joy of Bermuda. It is her jewel, her gem of gems. In her conversation, her pulpit, her literature, it is her most frequent and eloquent figure“.

For more information about the rise and fall of the Bermuda Onion, see the following links:

http://bernews.com/2012/01/rise-and-fall-of-the-bermuda-onion/

http://www.gotobermuda.com/blog/What%E2%80%99s-the-Scoop-on-Bermuda%E2%80%99s-Onion-Obsession-/?blogid=15032385562

http://www.thebermudian.com/food-drink/1237-bermuda-onions

http://bernews.com/2016/05/photos-bermuda-onion-day-at-carter-house/

It is interesting to note that the Vidalia Onion, grown in Georgia, USA, is a descendant of the Bermuda Onion.

The Vidalia Onion is a sweet onion with a bitterly litigious history. See, for example:

http://articles.latimes.com/1986-02-13/news/mn-23185_1_onions

http://savannahnow.com/stories/092200/LOCvidaliaseeds.shtml#.V7XS03xTHIU

http://www.mnn.com/your-home/organic-farming-gardening/stories/the-bitter-legal-battle-behind-the-sweet-vidalia-onion

http://www.gpb.org/news/2015/01/12/vidalia-onions-lawsuit-heads-back-court

http://www.bloomberg.com/politics/articles/2015-08-04/bill-gates-foiled-by-georgia-s-powerful-vidalia-onion-regulators

 

 

 

 

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